2020 In Review: To Next Year

We’re nearing the end of 2020 and that means Good Vitis’ annual year-in-review piece. Every year I sit down to write one of these and I think, ‘how self-indulgent can you be?’ This hesitation has been particularly acute in 2020 because of COVID, the summer of social unrest, and the election that won’t end. My wife and I got a second dog this year, moved from DC to Chicago during COVID so my wife could start a new job, and some of my work touches on the social issues most hotly debated this year, as well as the election itself, so we’ve been in the thick of things. Thankfully we haven’t lost anyone to the pandemic or suffered in any direct way, even as we take our personal responsibility to public health seriously and diligently. Life remains good to us, knock on wood, and we feel deeply for those who haven’t fared as well. So…wine highlights? I’ll tell you why the answer is yes.

During these dark days, wine has been an important part of life because it has contributed some normalcy, and offered opportunities to connect with people and experience other parts of the world while quarantining. I spent considerable time on Zoom and the phone talking to winemakers across the country, helping me stay connected to the outside world as I meet new people who share my passion. Exploring new wineries through samples has been a rare source of adventure. Opening wine from our cellar that has been aging for five or ten or twenty years has given us the opportunity to have something special to look forward to, marvel over, and reminisce about how it was acquired and what was happening that year. And, even though we haven’t seen most of our wine-drinking friends since pre-COVID days, it hasn’t stopped us from making future plans to share our favorite wines together, which gives us hope for the future. None of this is unique to COVID, but all of it has taken on added significance because of it. We all need something to keep us attached to good memories and help us generate new ones, and wine has been there for me this year in that department.

That said, 2020 was not a particularly noteworthy year in wine for us because of COVID. Sure, we drank great wine, but our inability to travel and share bottles with special people meant few exceptional wine experiences. This matters because while wine hits our taste, smell, and sight senses, it’s a story in a bottle that connects us to – and with – place, people, and history. A complete experience incorporates some of those elements in addition to the cork pop and pour that so many of us do frequently at home. Unfortunately, this became collateral damage to COVID.

Nevertheless, on balance wine was an important contribution to the good things that occurred this year. As has become the tradition, every year-in-review piece is done a bit differently from previous years. 2019 was the most revelatory moments, 2018 and 2017 the most memorable wine, and 2016 the best reds, whites, and values. 2020’s theme: The Year Of. I put a lot of thought into whether to include the incredible fires of 2020 that affected wine country, but decided to punt on that until the full impact on the vintage is known.

2020: The Year of Pinot Noir

Pinot noir has a reputation as a wine that can take people a fair amount of time to warm up to. It’s a hard variety to put your finger on: its versatility can be made into many styles and its ability to reflect terroir can produce a multitude of profiles. With infinite style and profile combinations, there are bound to be pinots that pinot lovers dislike, and pinots that pinot haters can tolerate, if not enjoy. It’s also a variety that can be quite transformational with extended aging, meaning the same wine can evolve into multiple versions of itself. And it’s prolific, made nearly everywhere in the world.

With all its permutations, it’s easy to have a few bottles you don’t enjoy and decide that’s enough pinot for you. Plus, if you’re not ready for the more traditional pinot and that’s what you get, it can be a huge turnoff. I’ve lost count of the number of stories I hear that go something like ‘a friend poured me a glass of (insert wine here) and all I could taste was dirt and mushrooms and it was the last pinot I’ll have because it was gross.’

It certainly took me a few years to warm up to pinot (I took a flyer on a Volnay early in my wine days, which I’d probably love now, that didn’t go over well then). Because of the blog, the number and quality of pinot I tasted jumped significantly in 2019, and again in 2020 because of the number of Good Vitis articles that centered on pinot. This year’s pinot posts included a profile on California’s Anderson Valley (a pinot haven); research for a forthcoming profile on California’s Santa Lucia Highlands (another pinot mecca); and profiles of pinot specialists Clarice, Beau Marchais, Siduri, Peake Ranch, Merry Edwards, and a forthcoming profile of The Hilt. Those articles alone “required” tasting over 5 dozen pinots. We put in the hard work so you don’t have to; you’re welcome. And this doesn’t even include the exceptional pinot we drank from our private stash, including Oregon favorites Belle Pente, Cameron, Domaine Serene, Penner-Ash, and Zena Crown, plus some old Burgundy.

Beau Marchais barrel samples

One of the most surprising moments of 2020 involved pinot as well. Normally an expensive wine, the best value I came across in 2020 was actually a pinot noir. Made by Lucky Rock, this killer wine costs just $22 and is a purposeful thorn in the side of upper hoity toity wine society that turns both butt cheeks at such plonk.  

This year’s exploration further confirmed pinot noir’s bona fides as one of wine’s noble varieties for me. Pinot can give one an experience that doesn’t entirely make sense, which makes it quite hard to describe in a medium like this. Pinot flourishes as an a posteriori wine, giving us a lot to experience and learn from. But it’s real value is the a priori experience it can provide, going beyond what we can identify by giving us aromas, flavors, structures, and textures that are without comparison and require some theoretical deduction to wrap our heads around.

This seemingly illogical description is quite reflective of the experience one can have with pinot, able to pinpoint flavors, aromas, textures, and structures while feeling incomplete in one’s ability to describe the experience at hand. The more pinot I experience, the less I know about the variety.

2020: The Year of Zoom

You might have notice that Zoom is a thing. Many of us have spent countless hours on video conference as we work, socialize, or attend school and events from home. The same is true of the wine industry. With the limitation/inability of doing in-person tastings, wineries and public relations firms embraced Zoom tastings. I certainly did my fair share of them with wine glass in hand. I don’t have a ton of poignancy to add on this front other than two interesting anecdotes to share as data points.

Lot of time spent in front of this thing

First, when I profiled brick and mortar-less Clarice Wine Company and its inaugural release (2017 vintage) in 2019, I outlined the unusual business model that owner and winemaker Adam Lee designed to offer multiple touchpoints for customers. This included an online forum for Clarice members to connect with each other, which in its first year turned out to be less used that Adam expected. However, with COVID the forum lit up, and Adam combined that serge of community with another element of his unusual business plan, offering discounts to his members on other wineries owned by friends of his, to schedule an incredible amount of Zoom tastings with other winemakers to discuss their wines and experience. This effort helped his followers and customers expand their palates and knowledge while driving additional business to these partner wineries.

Second, in a very recent discussion with Wine Enthusiast’s Winemaker of the Year Greg Brewer, Greg told me that while he badly misses the in-person interactions with customers and clients, the ability to pop in on an event via Zoom for five or ten minutes and provide some additional value for the participants is something he’s come to really appreciate, and imagines will continue to be something he does even when he’s Zoomed in on in-person events.

Zoom has been a Godsend for many people for many reasons, including the wine industry. And, it may be the gift that keeps on giving even when COVID is fully in our rearview mirror.

2020: The Year of Champagne

It became clear to my wife and I this year that when there’s something to celebrate, it should be celebrated. We shouldn’t be too picky about it. And when we think celebration, we think Champagne. It’s unfair to limit the use of Champagne to celebrations, although that’s the stereotype the industry has perpetuated in the name of sales and brand ID. It’s also a bit stupid because Champagne is one of the best food-pairing wines out there, full stop. But that’s another discussion.

At some point in 2020 we decided we wanted bubbles to be more of a fixture in our routine, and so I set out to assemble a dozen or so bottles for us to try. I went to social media, getting great recommendations from a number of people. Although we experimented with a number of non-Champagne bubbles, we always came back to three wines that have become our core sparkling wines, all of them from the region of Reims:

NV Taittinger Brut Prestige Rosé: We tried a number of rosé’s, including Billecart-Salmon, considered by many to be the industry standard basic quality rosé, and didn’t find anything we liked nearly as much as Taittinger’s Brut Prestige Rosé. A combination of pinot noir and pinot meunier, it strikes a great balance between lean acidic cut and creamy body; has the kind of lush, fine mousse we love; and drinks equally well alone as it does with food. We rarely drink more than two or three bottles of any vintage of any wine because we prize variety, but we blew through more than a case of this in 2020.

NV Egly-Ouriet Premeir Cru Vignes de Vrigny: This cat’s-out-of-the-bag grower Champagne house was a no-brainer to try, and we fell hard for this rare Premier Cru-level 100% pinot meunier Champagne. It’s 38 months on lees is, according to the winemaker, a modern regional record. The result is a savory, substantive, and succulent Champagne with great minerality and depth that drinks well now, though I’m trying to exercise patience and keep a few in the cellar to open in five or seven years because it has that kind of promise for evolution.

NV Bérêche et Fils Brut Réserve: This one came via an Instagram recommendation, and was my favorite new discovery. It’s a full-bodied, dense, cider-y, creamy, yeasty, and brioche-y Champagne that stands out very distinctively – and elegantly – from the far more common profile of what seems to be one of today’s dominant wine trends of strip-your-enamel acid. This is my favorite Champagne to drink on its own for that reason in particular.

2020: The Year of Residual Sugar

We are dedicated lovers of old sweet chenin blanc from Loire Valley, especially Domaine Huet Moelleux (the sweetest Vouvray designation). We fell in love with riesling after spending time in Mosel in 2019 while on our honeymoon, which also served as our introduction to Kabinett. This year, our official love affair with Kabinett and Spätlese rieslings began.

Kabinett and Spätlese are German designations for the amount of sugar content in the grape when it is harvested (note: neither distinction reflects how much residual sugar is left in the wine post-fermentation, meaning there are such things as dry Kabinett and Spätlese wines, which are given the additional distinction of “trocken,” “Grosses Gewächs,” or “Erstes Gewächs”).

The foundations for this love affair were laid by a 2007 Willi Schaefer Graacher Himmelreich Kabinett, a 2003 Selbach-Oster Zelting Schlossberg Auslese, and a magnum of Peter Lauer Barrel X riesling that paired well as a BYO bottle with a meal at a Laotian restaurant known for exceptionally authentic and authentically spicy food. Now, about a third of what we’re buying for ourselves are residual sugar wines, especially riesling and chenin blanc. A 1996 Schaefer Kabinett really sealed the deal.

One aspect of the beauty of varieties like riesling and chenin is that, whether dry or sweet, when aged for ten-plus years they take on qualities that make them exceptionally diverse in the food pairing department, an improvement, if possible, upon their distinction as great food wines even when young. Really great, old riesling or chenin goes equally and extraordinarily well with steak au poivre as it does Thai, and are also exceptional to drink on their own. There are no other varieties, I’d argue, that you can say that about. And that’s especially frustrating because the modern trend is dry riesling, even in the most famed areas for residual sugar. This means supply of residual sugar bottlings, both old and new, is shrinking.

The other frustrating thing with these wines is that, at least for us, they are so much better when they reach ten or twenty (or sometimes more) years of age and are worth the wait. This means we have to buy them at auction to support our addiction since we didn’t order cases of them when we were in high school. Our approach is to go mostly to auction, while slowly building a stock of new(ish) releases that we’ll drink when we’re (much) older.

2020: The Year of “Next year”

We were supposed to go to Japan and Belgium in 2020. We were supposed visit family, and celebrate birthdays with friends and good wine. We were supposed to volunteer. We were supposed to…supposed to…supposed to… “Next year” has become a common idea expressed towards the end of many conversations. The yearning for a better and more meaningful next year is a common theme for Jews like myself, which made it a bit easier to swallow each time I said it, though no less consequential.

At the end of the Passover Seder and the Yom Kippur Ne’ila service (two of the most important events in the Jewish year), diaspora Jews sing “L’Shana Haba’ah B’Yerushalayim,” which translates to “Next year in Jerusalem.” An inherent, in-our-DNA connection to Jerusalem, the heart and soul of Israel, is a core part of many Jew’s identities, mine included.

Jerusalem means “the city of peace” and uniquely occupies the intersection of body, soul, heaven, earth, ideal, and reality. Although also biblical, the Jewish connection to Jerusalem and the Land of Israel has been around for a lot longer than the Jewish religion. It comes from a time of Jewish nationhood, which preceded the Jewish religion by many generations. This is why there are numerous secular Jews for whom Jerusalem and Israel hold a special place in their hearts and souls, and why attacks on the Jewish connection to Israel, and Jewish self-determination in the Land of Israel, are attacks on Jewish identity.

A common description of Jerusalem’s Jewish significance is that you can be miles away from it even while living there, yet be on the other side of the world and be only a step away. When Jews left Egypt for the Land of Israel, they were escaping slavery and seeking the freedom of the Promised Land out of a yearning for the ancestral place where they could be free. In Egypt their bodies were owned and controlled by others, imprisoning their souls rather than being a vehicle for their expression. In Israel, and especially Jerusalem, their souls were free to pursue service to humanity, which is a core tenant of Jewish life. This sentiment remains a core value that Jews cherish today. Whether one actually lives there or not, Jerusalem is, in place and spirit, the best opportunity for Jews to live our best lives (in the parlance of our times).

In 2020, the secular “next year” took on a weightier significance then it had previously, at least in its common use. So much of what many of us have given up this year are things we do with and for other people – the things we do in service to humanity.

I’ve been working from home since 2017, so I’d been training for COVID for a few years on the work front. However, that didn’t cover things like having to keep physical distance from family, friends, friends’ COVID babies and dogs, seriously sick friends, and close colleagues. Even Next Year in Jerusalem, always a communal exclamation, became something we said in the solitude of our own homes while watching services on our television. It’s been a hard year to maintain relationships, though the shared experience of COVID at least provides for a universally understood reason (and excuse). It’s been a year where selfishness can be selflessness if done right and for the right reasons, but also a year where selfishness can be masked as selflessness or unmasked for what it is. It’s been an entirely mixed bag.

I’m really hoping that “next year” is prophetic and what we’ve had to postpone in 2020 can happen in 2021. Like you, I have a long list of people and places I want to visit, and things I want to do. I’m eager for a return to normalcy, though I anticipate it will be a new normal, with tweaks to the old normal based on what we’ve learned this year. As the year winds down, we’ll be raising our wine glasses to everyone in our family and yours, and channeling our strong desire and hope for a better 2021 for all, including a renewed focus on how we can serve each other. To next year.

Myth vs. Fact: 5 Things Wine Consumers Should Know

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I think we’d all like to believe that wine is made to be the best wine that it can be. Unfortunately, I’ve come to learn that wine is made as much as, if not more so, according to the economics of wine as it is to the ideal vinicultural and enological standards and practices. I hate to de-romanticize good vitis, but I think it’s for the best because having a better understanding of the business of winemaking should make everyone a better wine customer. It took interning at a winery and writing this blog for a few years for me to learn and appreciate the impact of business-side factors on the wine that I drink, and it’s brought me to a greater appreciation of the industry and its product.

Knowledge of the business helps consumes because business-side decisions ultimately shape the product we buy: the type of glass and bottle chosen, its vineyard sources and how the grapes are harvested, barrel regime and winemaking methods, where it gets sold and how it is priced, and more. It turns out that many of the winemaking decisions winemakers talk about as being stylistic choices are made from a list of options constrained by the economic realities and business limitations imposed upon them by ownership, regulations, sales structures, distribution and the marketplace.

A good understanding and appreciation of wine therefore requires not just knowing where it is from and how it was made, but also the economics of making, marketing, distributing and selling it. With this in mind, I’m offering a list of what I believe are five pivotal wine business realities for consumers to know.

Myth #1: The Wine Business Makes People Rich

Picture: Napa Valley Film Festival

Fact #1: It is extraordinarily rare to make millions in the wine industry.

There’s a saying in the industry that the way to make a small fortune in wine is to start with a large one. Though one might assume this joke (and rule of thumb) applies more to higher cost areas like Napa where choice acreage can go for as much as $1 million per, its applicability has as much to do with location as any other factor, of which there are many.

The wine business is a low margin one, and therefore requires sufficient volume to turn a profit. The largest wineries have tackled this with a model that produces a lot of wine that doesn’t require expensive inputs so they can sell higher quantities at lower prices. Making really good wines in this category is an art, though also a rarity.

On the other end of the spectrum, small boutique producers sell very high quality and expensive wine in very limited quantities. Between these two ends of the spectrum are a variety of sizes and models designed to turn a profit on the kind and quantity of wine they want to produce. Some are a hybrid of both ends, paying their bills with entry-level higher margin wines at bigger production numbers and while getting their high quality fix with higher end limited production wines. Hess Collection is a great example of this hybrid model, making good wines at price points from ~$10 to over $100 (click here for more on Hess). All this being the case, profit margins are driven by numerous factors of which the cost of production is just one.

Why this matters to consumers: It is helpful to know that 99% of wineries are not significant money makers even though you may be paying quite the tariff for a bottle or tasting fee because it contextualizes a number of things, among the most important (1) you’re not entitled to special treatment by a winery because you buy their wine or visit them (an expectation that occurs more than one might anticipate), (2) because wine is a hyper competitive market, what they’re offering you likely represents the most they can offer while maintaining profitability, (3) this is why discounts are usually small and connected to higher quantity purchases, (4) the wine industry is not full of wealthy people living a lavish lifestyle, so you’re not as disconnected from them as you may think, and (5) don’t look down your nose as necessarily selfish or shallow actions like cost-saving measures, decisions to “sell out” by selling to a parent company or advertising campaigns meant to attract customers who are unlike you.

Myth #2: Quality Wine is Overpriced

When all the customers answer "Overpriced" - Meme Generator
Picture: meme-generator.com

Fact #2: The price you pay for a wine – any price – is a realistic reflection of how much that bottle costs to produce multiplied by the winery’s need to sell it and the market demand of that specific bottle compared to its peers.

Though this formula is subjective, it is not as subjective as you might believe. Let’s take on pinot noir as an example. Pinot is an expensive wine to buy relative to most other red wines. This is mostly driven by the following factors:

  • It is more finicky to grow and more delicate to make relative to most other red wines, meaning there is more that can go wrong in its production relative to other red wines. Quality and quantity are not as consistent from year-to-year as they are for many other red wines. These factors create a high opportunity cost for pinot producers that gets passed on to consumers to maintain economic viability.
  • Many believe the best pinot noir is made by aging in French oak, which creates a self-reinforcing consumer expectation for it, and is expensive relative to most other barrels.
  • The demand side pushes cost because pinot is more desirable relative to most other red wines. This is a more subjective cost driver than input costs, and is increasingly subjective the higher in price you go. While the generally accepted best entry level pinot noirs from pinot regions like California, Oregon and Burgundy start at around $20-25, the biggest jumps in prices come towards the higher end and reflect scarcity and exclusivity more than quality. The difference in quality and uniqueness between a $75 pinot and a $150 pinot is generally less dramatic than the difference between a $25 and $75 pinot. The most expensive pinots, regardless of where they come from, reflect their scarcity and prestige in the price more than any dramatic difference in quality.

A number of people in the industry have told me that the most appropriate price for a wine is the amount people are willing to pay for it. Some brands carry certain reputations that allow them to charge more than their peers, which often means those brands are doing extra work to build and maintain their reputations, including (but not limited to) producing smaller quantities to maintain exclusivity. While these efforts don’t necessarily reflect the quality of the wine, they can reflect an added cost input. It’s no secret that part of what makes designer products so expensive is the amount they spend on advertising and promotion. The wine industry is no different in terms of the high cost of generating and maintaining excitement and desirability among certain customer demographics.

Why this matters to the consumer: The final price you pay is reflective of how much it costs to produce, where consumers place it among its peers and the extent to which the wine is desirable. This is to say, you’re likely paying fair market value even if you feel like you’re getting a bad deal.

Myth #3: The Framework for Distributing and Selling Wine in America Benefits Consumers

Fact #3: Our three tier system limits customer choice, hurts small wineries, and makes wine more expensive to buy.

With all due respect to my friends in the distribution and wholesale tier, and those in the regulatory agencies, the compromises this country made to get out of Prohibition suck. In addition to adopting the three tier system, the compromise that ended the federal prohibition on alcohol included giving each state the protected right to set most of the laws that affect the liquor business within their respective borders. Regardless of one’s political ideology, it shouldn’t be hard to understand why fifty independent sets of regulations, rather than one, is a bad thing.

The three tier system is made up of, yep, three tiers: the producer, the distributor/wholesaler, and the retailer. For a consumer to purchase a bottle of wine outside of a winery, the winery must first sell to a distributor or wholesaler, who must then sell to a retailer, who can then sell to the consumer. The middle man second layer adds an extra margin to the price while also doubling marketplace competition  (the winery must offer a competitive price to the distributor/wholesaler who, in turn, must offer a competitive price to the retailer) that puts extra pressure on the producer to create room to bargain on unit price, often achieved by reducing costs (which can reduce quality). I could write a tomb on this, but won’t. I could also make a career out of ending it if someone had a decent number of billions of dollars to fund my efforts (anyone?). So, in brief, a few things to chew on:

(1) Corruption happens in highly regulated industries. Alcohol is very, very regulated. The ability to get a liquor license, distribution permit, import permit, retail license, permission to ship out of or into a state, and more, are all effected by corruption in one way or another. This artificial influence on the marketplace creates artificial – noncompetitive – distortions that skew consumer choice and inflate or deflate prices (depending on the situation).

(2) Fifty sets of regulations plus three tiers of selling means the financial and labor cost of meeting the regulatory burden and expanding one’s market (paying for distribution) is incredibly high. Further, because it raises the cost of doing business out of state the same amount for each winery regardless of size or profits, it disadvantages smaller and many medium-sized wineries that can’t afford the costs. This limits the geographic footprint of their prospective consumer base – and the number of consumers who both want their wines and are able to get them.

(3) The combination of #1 and #2 creates semi-monopolies for the large winery ownership groups/corporations that can pool resources from across their portfolio to ensure all of their labels are available everywhere. Depending on how the ownership group/corporation handles this advantaged position, this can be a good or bad thing for the industry. Some do it more humbly and intelligently than others.

(4) It incentivizes distributors and retailers to push larger labels (and wineries owned by larger labels) because they offer the distributor and retailer higher profit margins than smaller production wines that come at a higher per-unit cost but retail for the same price.

Why this matters to the consumer: Government regulation and an entrenched interest group (the second tier) are creating and enforcing a distorted marketplace in which you are forced to pay an artificially inflated price for wine you’re choosing from an artificially limited selection.

Myth #4: Growing Wine Grapes is Simple

File:Harvesting grapes in Chateaux Luna vineyard 1.jpg

Fact #4: Vineyard decisions are major decisions that can be significant drivers of cost and quality.

One of the most cliché things you hear about wine is that it’s made in the vineyard. But even though the point gets overused, it can be very true if a winery wants it to be true. And for many of us, our favorite wines tend to be legitimately made in the vineyard.

Vineyards are also where some of the biggest unknowns in winemaking exist because the unpredictable and cruel Mother Nature sets the course. Vines are susceptible to weather events, pests, bacteria, hungry wildlife, fires and much more. This makes vineyard management an inherently defensive, reactive enterprise even though there are strategies and tactics for setting a vineyard up for success before there’s a problem. To hear winemakers and vineyard managers describe any particular vintage, they talk about all the proactive stuff they do, but when the unfortunate and inevitable “but” drops, it is almost always an act of nature that couldn’t be prevented. This makes making vineyard-driven winemaking risky and challenging, and explains what can be dramatic vintage variation from low-intervention winemakers. Preparing for and coping with Mother Nature is one of the factors that separates the Winemakers from the winemakers.

Additionally, vineyards require a lot of money and planning and take at least three years to mature once planted before commercial wine can be produced, if not five. Terroir-driven wines benefit most from well-planned vineyards, meaning the right sites and soils are found, then prepared prior to planting, and planted with the right vines, clones and rootstocks, and given the TLC needed to raise them right. From site scouting to purchase; from doing the soil and climate research needed to identify the right varietals, clones and rootstocks and the year it takes to get them once ordered; from the planting to the nurturing of young vines for at least three years before production-worthy grapes are produced, it can take upwards of six or seven years easy before a vineyard is producing. It takes many more years before all the investment is paid off and a profit is turned.

Why this matters to the consumer: Knowing how wineries approach their vineyards and vineyard sourcing (buying grapes from other growers) helps one differentiate between wineries in terms of the planning, care and investment they make in their vineyards. Those wineries that do it right, meaning those that take the time to do the research and don’t rush the process, are more likely to produce a greater run of better wine than those that don’t, all other factors being equal.

Myth #5: If it’s on the Shelf, it’s Ready to Drink

Neil Patrick Harris Drink Or Dish GIF by The Meredith Vieira Show - Find &  Share on GIPHY

Fact #5: Most premium wine will never be consumed at its best.

Estimates vary, but it’s safe to say that at least 90% of wine sold in America is consumed within a week of being purchased. The actual number is probably at least 95%, especially during COVID. The vast majority of that segment buy their wine from grocery stores and large wine sellers like Total Wines, which means most of that wine is sub or barely “premium wine” (a term that is usually defined as $20+ per bottle) and likely the current release (most recent vintage released for public sale). Sub or barely premium is fine (and in most cases probably best) to drink upon release like this.

However, most premium wine, I would argue red and white, improve over the three to five years following their release. I would put most New World premium red wine into this category, and a fair amount of wines from Old World regions. A smaller but sizeable chunk of premium wine doesn’t show its best for at least a decade. This is mostly Old World wine, with some New World in the mix.

It is impossible to know how much premium wine is captured in that 90%+ statistic, but I can offer significant antidotal evidence that it’s a statistically significant percentage. I’ve spoken with dozens of premium wine producers, and often ask them how many of their clientele, do they think, age their wines to full maturity. The answer is usually something like “very few” or “barely any.” Further antidotal evidence can be found looking at wine reviews on CellarTracker, a website used predominantly by discerning consumers that purchase the world’s better and best wines, where numerous reviews show evidence of premature consumption of wines that show their best years, if not decades, after release.

One could argue that the industry should shift to consumer preference and make more wines that are more accessible (meaning wines that require less aging to fully mature) upon release. That’s a fair argument, and a good chunk of premium wine producers make two levels of wine – somewhat less expensive and more accessible wines, and more expensive and age worthy wines. But for a small but dedicated segment of the market (where I reside), there’s nothing better than a fully mature premium wine. Thankfully, plenty of winemakers fall into that camp as well, and are able to make a few wines each that we fellow old wine lovers choose to age for years and years.

Why this matters to the consumer: Unless you thoroughly enjoy (or even prefer) young premium wine, you’re not getting the experience out of the wines you are buying that the wines – and the winemaker – intend you to have. Therefore, you may want to rethink your purchasing decisions because you may end up getting more pleasure out of different – and often less expensive – wine. Or, you should consider buying a wine cooler and putting some of your more structured wines to rest for a few years.

Author’s Note: This is the first Good Vitis piece focused exclusively on the business side of wine, which means it may be one of the more controversial pieces from this blog among our industry friends and followers. I hope it will be one of the more useful pieces for our readership. Regardless of whether you’re industry or a consumer, I’d love to hear your feedback. Please share it either with the group (post a comment) or send it directly to me at goodvitis(at)gmail(dot)com.