The Best Reds, Whites & Values of 2016

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Picture credit: Punjabigraphics.com

It’s January 3rd, 2017 and as a wine blogger it is my formulaic obligation to put together a list of the best wines I consumed in 2016. This isn’t a top-100 list compiled by an established wine blogger. Rather, it is a relatively short list and the pool from which they came is limited to the wines I sought out myself. Hence, I feel confident recommending them seeing as I put my own money into them. Click on the wines to see where they’re available.

The Ten Best Red Wines

1. 2000 Cameron Abbey Ridge pinot noir. I’ve written already in these pages that this is the most memorable wine I’ve ever had, and probably the best as well. I’m probably cheating Cameron by not also including the 2003 Abbey Ridge, which was barely one notch below the 2000, in the list but I don’t want to be redundant, especially since neither is likely to be available outside private cellar purchases and auctions. Full tasting note.

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Abbey Ridge Vineyard (picture credit: cameronwines.com)

2. 2007 Arns Melanson Vineyard syrah. The 2007 Arns Melanson syrah from California fleeced a group of wine collectors all in a blind tasting I participated in. We had a good number of syrahs from around the world lined up and paper bagged and the only unanimous guess was that this was Northern Rhone. It was also perfectly aged. Pure bliss, a top-5 all time wine for me. I didn’t take notes but it would’ve received at least a 95, and I just found another one to stash away for an important occasion in 2017.

3. 2009 Reynvaan The Contender syrah. Savory goodness, and this vintage is still around to be gobbled up if you look hard enough for it. A few Washington wineries are producing syrahs that balance classic Northern Rhone notes with Washington State’s dark fruit, iodine and graphite added it, and Reynvaan is as good as any. Full tasting note.

4. 1998 Chateau de Beaucastel Chateanuneuf-du-Pape. Proof that good CdP improves with extended cellaring, this delivered the best of what you find across the full range of CdPs all in one profile as smooth as a baby’s bottom. I’ve seen this up for auction and suggest you track one down. Full tasting note.

5. 2010 Clendenen Family Vineyards Nebbiolo Bricco Buon Natale. I’m not an avid drinker of nebbiolo but this one has me wanting to try more. Impressively complex profile that hits on flavors and aromas from quince to Allspice to watermelon (seriously). Changing with each passing hour, it is an adventure that becomes increasingly engaging and enjoyable with each sip. The value on this one is out of this world, too.

6. 2001 E. Guigal Cote-Rotie Chateau d’Ampuis. I’ve listed two American savory syrahs above this one, but there’s no getting around the fact that older Guigal like this, the stuff done before the winery embraced the Parker profile, is as good a savory profile comes. Old World brilliance. Full tasting note.

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The Chateau d’Ampuis (picture credit: guigal.com)

7. 2013 Gramercy Cellars Cabernet Franc (wine club only). This was unbelievably good. It isn’t Chinon-styled funky cabernet franc, but it isn’t big fruit and no Earth California cabernet franc, either. It’s a nice tweener that was one of the more satisfying wines I had in 2016. Full tasting note.

8. 2012 Psagot Winery Cabernet Sauvignon. As many Israeli wine as I’ve had, and I’ve had more than a few, this wine was a revelation for me. I’ve found a lot of good and a lot of bad Israeli wines, and my complaint throughout is that the country’s wine industry still hasn’t developed a signature style that people want to seek out. This bottle from Psagot doesn’t solve this problem for me, but it provided the best counter argument yet that I should just shut up and enjoy what’s in the glass. This is world class cabernet and it won’t set you back much. Full tasting note.

9. 2011 Lauren Ashton Cabernet Sauvignon. From a difficult vintage this one far surpassed many Washington cabernets from better years. I ended my tasting note with “exactly what I hope for when I open a cabernet sauvignon from Washington.” This producer consistently turns out fantastic wines but this may be the best executed yet. Full tasting note.

10. 2009 Delille Cellars Harrison Hill. Always one of my very favorite wines, though this vintage didn’t blow me away (is still too young). Nevertheless, it still delivered on the best aspect of the Harrison Hill blend: it’s a master blending job by winemaker Chris Upchurch in the sense that the profile is always somehow so much more than combination of the parts. Full tasting note.

The Five Best White Wines

1. 2010 Eric Morgat L’Enclos Savennieres. I didn’t take tasting notes, but my memories of it remain stronger than many wines for which I do have tasting notes, which is why it’s #1. Aged chenin blanc from Savennieres in the Loire Valley has been one of the more profound wine revelations I’ve had because of its deep complexity, it’s ability to improve with age, the evolution it goes through in the glass and the way it balances richness with streaky acidity. Morgat consistently makes complete wines Savennieres and shouldn’t be missed.

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Monsieur Morgat’s vines (picture credit: Le Figaro)

2. 2013 Cameron Winery Abbey Ridge chardonnay. This was my first introduction to Cameron’s whites and it led to a frantic effort to buy up as many as I could find. It’s revelation was how it brought everything good about chardonnay into one glass, including, most impressively, the richness and depth of fruit and nutty flavors of Cote de Beaune with the nervous, tense streaks of a Chablis. I keep adding Oregon chardonnay to my cellar. Full tasting note.

3. 2013 Latta Roussanne. Often times 100% roussanne is singularly dense, rich and sweet. Andrew Latta, formerly of Washington legends Dunham Cellars and K Vintners, avoids all that in this bottle of what roussanne can and should be: a wine that fills your mouth with lush flavors but slowly surprises you with flurries of zesty citrus and stone flavors that liven up the malo-like hangover of this full bodied varietal. Full tasting note.

4. 2015 Penner-Ash Viognier. Your eyes are seeing (nearly) double: often times 100% viognier is singulrarly dense, rich and sweet. Penner-Ash avoids all that in this bottle of what viognier can and should be: a wine that fills your mouth with lush flavors but slowly surprises you with flurries of zesty acidity and streaky tension that livens up the prototypical “tropicallity” of viognier. Give this another 1-2 years and it’ll be even better. Full tasting note.

5. 2008 Francois Chidaine Montlouis-sur-Loire Clos du Breuil. Between this wine and the Morgat my next trip to France will include a few days in the Loire. What made this one stand out is the incredible promise it still holds at age eight for the ability to evolve into something even better. Full tasting note.

The Five Best Values of 2016

1. 2014 Barkan Pinot Noir Classic. If I had tasted this blind I would’ve called expensive California pinot. Instead it’s from Israel and it’s roughly $12. Check out these tasting notes: “Nose: very expressive. Blueberries, blackberries and boysenberries. Big rose petals and Spring pollen. Smoke, iodine. Fruit punch. White pepper. Freshly tanned leather and young tobacco leaf. Licorice root. Beautiful bouquet. Palate: medium body, medium acidity. Integrated, modest tannin. Fruit is tart blueberries, huckleberries and red plums. Blood orange. Tar, hickory smoke. Herbs de Provence. Celery.” All that for $12; buy this for big events. Full tasting note.

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A Barkan vineyard in the Negev desert where the grapes for its 2014 Classic pinot noir are grown (picture credit: Barkan Winery)

2. 2010 Fausse Piste Garde Manger syrah. Sadly this vintage isn’t available anymore, but that won’t stop me from trying the current release in 2017. For ~$20 it’s hard to find a syrah with this much complexity. What’s more, 2010 wasn’t an easy year, making this all the more impressive. Full tasting note.

3. 2013 Two Vintners Make Haste (unavailable). This 100% Washington cinsault elicited the biggest smile induced by a single gulp of wine in 2016, it was just so much fun; I can’t even stop smiling when I just think about this wine (it is literally impossible to can stop smiling). Full tasting note.

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Two Vintners and the sun makin’ haste over Washington, D.C.

4. 2012 Bergstrom Old Stones chardonnay. It’s $22 Oregon chardonnay and I didn’t want to share it with my girlfriend’s family, which I was supposed to do, after I had m first sip. All this for twenty three bucks: limestone, saline, Meyer lemon, vanilla custard, Starfruit and Granny Smith apple tucked into finely balanced medium bodied wine. Full tasting note.

5. 2014 Galil Mountain Viognier. Another impressive value from Israel, this is a go-to medium bodied viognier for $15 that has enough acidity to please the refined palate and enough sweet tropical flavors to please the Millennial drinker. Huge recommendation as a wedding wine. Full tasting note.

My Most Memorable Whites

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I opened Good Vitis with a post about my ten most memorable red wines. Then, I followed up with a post a few days later about the Wine Curmudgeon’s “winestream media” analysis that suggested the major American wine publications favored reds over whites by giving the former more 90+ point reviews than the latter. And now, I’m about to go through my most memorable white wines and there are, count em’, eight. My memorable red post originally had 16 reds but due to space I narrowed the list to 10. With the whites, I couldn’t even get to ten. Do I have a red wine bias?

Couple of things for consideration:

  1. I’ve long drank more reds than whites
  2. I’ve long appreciated reds more than whites
  3. I bought my first white wine for aging within the last year

My experiences with the eight whites below have convinced me that my red wine bias is stupid. As someone who likes good wine, I’d been keeping myself away from a category of wine that offers experiences equally but also uniquely rewarding as the red one. These eight whites have collectively triggered a shift in my thinking about how to consider and approach white wine, with the key change being simply exposure to the levels of complexity and depth whites can achieve when done well. My cellar has shifted from 100% red to 85% red/15% white over the last year as I stock up on chardonnays and chenin blancs, and the trend will likely continue as I expand my chardonnay sourcing while also branching into age-worthy gruner veltliner. On to the wines!

Category: so there is good white wine!

Winners: Buty Semillon/Sauvignon Blanc/Muscadelle blend and Delille Cellars Chaleaur Estate Blanc

For a very long time I was obsessed with Washington wine. While I still am to a very real extent, I’ve narrowed the Washington wineries I purchase down to around half a dozen as I become (1) more discerning about specific vineyards and winemakers and (2) more interested in other areas of the world. This initial focus on Washington limited my exposure to whites because the state’s wineries tend to focus their higher end products on the red end of the spectrum. Top wineries like Buty and Delille, for example, produce a range of fantastic wines that are light on the whites, and within the overall collection of fine Washington wines the red/white mix is heavy on the red. Part of this is I’m sure demand trends, but I’m quite curious to understand how much of this is the state’s ability to produce world class whites. That’s a story for another post.

These two wines certainly do show, however, that Washington can do world class whites. I first had Buty’s Bordeaux-esque blend in 2009 at a tasting at one of Seattle’s preeminent wine stores, McCarthy & Schiering, and it’s a vivid memory in which my entire attention was consumed by a “wow, so there is good white wine after all!” epiphany. I’ve had every vintage of this wine since and it’s among the top 5 wines I’ve consumed by volume. It’s a solid $25 purchase every time.

Delille’s Chaleur Estate Blanc is a more accurate version of a Bordeaux blend as it skips the Muscadelle, which makes the Buty a bit lighter and more approachable. While the Delille is certainly great at release (93-95 points annually since 2007 from Stephen Tanzer, Robert Parker and Wine Advocate) it really shines with a few years in the bottle. It’s a dense, concentrated and complex wine with a mouthfeel as comforting and satisfying as green tea with honey on a cold day. And at $38 SRP it’s not cheap, but it is very competitive at that price in terms of quality and ageworthiness. Drink the Buty in the first year or two after release, and the Delille 2-4 years after release. They’re both gorgeous.

Category: hey, it turns out I like chardonnay!

Winner: 2012 Lauren Ashton Cellars Chardonnay Reserve

This is the bottle of chardonnay that made me a chardonnay fan. My notes when I drank the first (of several) of these:

Nose: Very Bordeaux-like with straw and honey, this is a trip. Some of that vanilla, peach, and oak start to come through. Partial malolactic is apparent. So is the green apple, which is strong. Good limestone minerality, too. Very aromatic wine. Palate: Hard to discern between a Bordeaux and Chardonnay, really trippy. Very clean and crisp with some oak backbone and light toast, but not heavy or oaky or dominated by vanilla. Good acidity and fruit, predominantly apple and pineapple; maybe a little starfruit/lime acidity. Really appreciate the balance of acidity/crispiness and body, speaking to only partial malolactic treatment and great judgement in oak selection, barrel timing, and re-racking (it’s nicely settled and clearly has a defined personality). With additional air the lime sorbet gets stronger. Finish: it’s the acidity and citrus that ride it out. The body fades smoothly. This is a very good wine. 94 points

“Hard to discern between a Bordeaux and Chardonnay?” After the Buty and Delille blends, seems like a good gateway chardonnay for me, right? What made this one stand out was the lift it received from a solid streak of acidity that I hadn’t found paired with real complexity and good structure in any previous chardonnay I’d had. Lauren Ashton sadly hasn’t made a reserve since 2012.

Category: I don’t know what “it” is, but this has it

Winner: Greywacke Wild Sauvignon Blanc 2012

Listen, I hate the generic New Zealand sauv blanc that’s flooded American wine stores, restaurants and bars as much as anyone; it’s become an epidemic. But this one is truly wild. My Cellartracker notes:

Spoiler alert: this is an exceptionally cool wine. The wild yeast makes this a truly unique wine with flavors and scents I’ve never tasted or smelled on any other wine, some of them unidentifiable. Nose: Savage. White peach, lemon curd. Unripe Starfruit tanginess. Dandelion. Wet stone. And stuff we can only identify as having to come from the wild yeast. Palate: very smooth with just a touch of graininess. Palate coating flavors that burst. Lots of sweet peace and rosemary up front, but it transfers into a light pucker in the back of the mouth with lemongrass flavors on a wave of bright acidity. And then of course some undefinable wild yeast flavors. Finish: very long lasting finish for a white. The acidity and peach carries on for a long, long time. As acid and peach fade, the lemon curd and grass emerge with an endearing sweetness. Overall this is a fantastic wine, a thinking drinker’s wine. It’s also fantastic with food, which brings out an extra layer of complexity. I need to find more of this. 94 points.

Incredibly complex just in the notes I could identify, and if those were all it offered then it would still be a fantastic bottle. But the wild elements that I couldn’t identify, they were smells and flavors I’d never experienced before, they put it over-the-top cool. Let me try to explain this a different way. Seven months prior to drinking this bottle, I went to Japan for the first time. Tokyo’s airport is a 45 minute drive outside the city, and the route takes you through mile after mile of rice patties. I’d never seen rice patties before in person, and they mesmerized me. All I wanted to do was walk through them and harvest rice; it just seemed like the most unadulterated way of engaging with nature. And then it hit me: I couldn’t remember the last time that I saw something for the first time. Think about it, when was the last truly unique experience you’ve had where even the context was totally new? My answer is the 2012 Greywacke Wild Sauvignon Blanc.

Category: intriguing as hell

Winner: 2010 Eric Morgat L’Enclos Savennieres (also available from Weygandt Wines in Washington, D.C.)

This was a serious “wow” wine. The 2009 is 99% as good, too, and the 2011 could well be better with a few more years (#vertical). I’d never had serious chenin blanc before this bottle, and I’m a true believer now. When done like this it has an incredibly full mouthfeel without developing any cloying sensation or residual sugar. Rather, it offers bright acidity and an incredible array of flavors. The result is a blend of the best traits of chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, Sauternes and viognier. Sadly, I took no notes when drinking this, but I have several of his wines aging now and will at some point review them, and I continue to build out my Morgat collection.

Category: craziest sensation

Winner: every nervous, tense Chablis I’ve had

Chablis falls into two categories for me: overly acidic and boring (bad Chablis), and so nervous you can’t turn your attention away (interesting and potentially great Chablis).  I have my favorite producers (William Fevre, Francois Raveneu, Domaine Servin) and my favorite sites (Montee de Tonnere, Montee de Tonnere and Montee de Tonnere), but every Chablis that can’t seem to accept its awesomeness is the one for me. If you’ve experienced this, you know what I’m talking about it. If you haven’t, I can promise you that it will be the subject of a future post.

Category: you stole my heart

2013 Birgit Eichenger Gruner Veltliner Weshselberg (also available from Weygandt in DC)

This wine, and each of the vintages of it that I’ve had, has stolen my heart. I haven’t had enough gruner yet to put my finger on exactly why it speaks to me, but if I had to guess it’s that when Birgit Eichenger makes this offering from Kamptal she blends awesome Chablis with remarkable petit mensang and viognier. That’s the best way I’ve developed to describe this wine. Here’s what I wrote about it:

Pale straw yellow. This is a magical wine. Nose: beautiful banana peel, stone fruit, straw, pine needles, Meyer lemon. Palate: very smooth viscosity, weighty palate. Banana, peach, cantaloupe, pineapple. Vanilla bean. Honey. High tones of limestone. Graphite. Orange sherbet. Bright acidity. Finish: acidity carries the whole palate, and as it fades we get a bit of petrol and wet asphalt. Pear is quite strong as well. Birgit Eichinger, you’ve stolen my heart. Will you marry me? 93 points

This bottle is just a whole lot of great stuff packed into a very pretty profile. I go through several of these each year.

Category: evolving with the best of em’

2014 Domaine de le Borde Abrois Pupillin Cote de Caillot

This is a very young wine, to be clear. It’s great now but I wish I could have a bottle every six months for the next 10 years. Here’s what it’s like now:

Nose: banana, honeysuckle. Chalk, dandelion and a fungal/forest floor thing. Slightly yeasty. With air, Asian five spice comes out and it starts to remind me of mead. Palate: medium plus body and acidity. Slight sweetness. Skin tannin. Very structured, pleasing smooth medium viscosity. Meyer lemon, honey. Lime sorbet, cantaloupe. Cinnamon and nutmeg. Cascade hops and flinty minerality. Finish: persistent and rich. Overall a gorgeous wine with the skin tannins providing a platform for a lot of different flavors to dance on. This one evolved over time as it sat in the glass, it has a long life ahead of it over which I’d be surprised if it didn’t go through several changes. Very interesting and expressive. 92 points.

I’m pretty new to Jura and while every bottle I’ve had hasn’t spoken to me, they’ve all been very interesting in their unique expressions. Jura is a place unto itself and not for the timid palate.

As my interest in whites grow, I’m putting more time and money into them. The red wine bias I had is over, and my next area of exploration is age-worthy Oregon chardonnays. Since August I’ve put away multiple bottles each from Adelsheim, Domaine Serene and Domaine Drouhin (plus viognier from Penner-Ash) that I’ll start exploring in the next few years, and when we hit the early 2020’s I’ll start opening the bottles from Cameron that I’ve laid down. In the meantime, I see plenty of white wine on my horizon.