Myth vs. Fact: 5 Things Wine Consumers Should Know

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I think we’d all like to believe that wine is made to be the best wine that it can be. Unfortunately, I’ve come to learn that wine is made as much as, if not more so, according to the economics of wine as it is to the ideal vinicultural and enological standards and practices. I hate to de-romanticize good vitis, but I think it’s for the best because having a better understanding of the business of winemaking should make everyone a better wine customer. It took interning at a winery and writing this blog for a few years for me to learn and appreciate the impact of business-side factors on the wine that I drink, and it’s brought me to a greater appreciation of the industry and its product.

Knowledge of the business helps consumes because business-side decisions ultimately shape the product we buy: the type of glass and bottle chosen, its vineyard sources and how the grapes are harvested, barrel regime and winemaking methods, where it gets sold and how it is priced, and more. It turns out that many of the winemaking decisions winemakers talk about as being stylistic choices are made from a list of options constrained by the economic realities and business limitations imposed upon them by ownership, regulations, sales structures, distribution and the marketplace.

A good understanding and appreciation of wine therefore requires not just knowing where it is from and how it was made, but also the economics of making, marketing, distributing and selling it. With this in mind, I’m offering a list of what I believe are five pivotal wine business realities for consumers to know.

Myth #1: The Wine Business Makes People Rich

Picture: Napa Valley Film Festival

Fact #1: It is extraordinarily rare to make millions in the wine industry.

There’s a saying in the industry that the way to make a small fortune in wine is to start with a large one. Though one might assume this joke (and rule of thumb) applies more to higher cost areas like Napa where choice acreage can go for as much as $1 million per, its applicability has as much to do with location as any other factor, of which there are many.

The wine business is a low margin one, and therefore requires sufficient volume to turn a profit. The largest wineries have tackled this with a model that produces a lot of wine that doesn’t require expensive inputs so they can sell higher quantities at lower prices. Making really good wines in this category is an art, though also a rarity.

On the other end of the spectrum, small boutique producers sell very high quality and expensive wine in very limited quantities. Between these two ends of the spectrum are a variety of sizes and models designed to turn a profit on the kind and quantity of wine they want to produce. Some are a hybrid of both ends, paying their bills with entry-level higher margin wines at bigger production numbers and while getting their high quality fix with higher end limited production wines. Hess Collection is a great example of this hybrid model, making good wines at price points from ~$10 to over $100 (click here for more on Hess). All this being the case, profit margins are driven by numerous factors of which the cost of production is just one.

Why this matters to consumers: It is helpful to know that 99% of wineries are not significant money makers even though you may be paying quite the tariff for a bottle or tasting fee because it contextualizes a number of things, among the most important (1) you’re not entitled to special treatment by a winery because you buy their wine or visit them (an expectation that occurs more than one might anticipate), (2) because wine is a hyper competitive market, what they’re offering you likely represents the most they can offer while maintaining profitability, (3) this is why discounts are usually small and connected to higher quantity purchases, (4) the wine industry is not full of wealthy people living a lavish lifestyle, so you’re not as disconnected from them as you may think, and (5) don’t look down your nose as necessarily selfish or shallow actions like cost-saving measures, decisions to “sell out” by selling to a parent company or advertising campaigns meant to attract customers who are unlike you.

Myth #2: Quality Wine is Overpriced

When all the customers answer "Overpriced" - Meme Generator
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Fact #2: The price you pay for a wine – any price – is a realistic reflection of how much that bottle costs to produce multiplied by the winery’s need to sell it and the market demand of that specific bottle compared to its peers.

Though this formula is subjective, it is not as subjective as you might believe. Let’s take on pinot noir as an example. Pinot is an expensive wine to buy relative to most other red wines. This is mostly driven by the following factors:

  • It is more finicky to grow and more delicate to make relative to most other red wines, meaning there is more that can go wrong in its production relative to other red wines. Quality and quantity are not as consistent from year-to-year as they are for many other red wines. These factors create a high opportunity cost for pinot producers that gets passed on to consumers to maintain economic viability.
  • Many believe the best pinot noir is made by aging in French oak, which creates a self-reinforcing consumer expectation for it, and is expensive relative to most other barrels.
  • The demand side pushes cost because pinot is more desirable relative to most other red wines. This is a more subjective cost driver than input costs, and is increasingly subjective the higher in price you go. While the generally accepted best entry level pinot noirs from pinot regions like California, Oregon and Burgundy start at around $20-25, the biggest jumps in prices come towards the higher end and reflect scarcity and exclusivity more than quality. The difference in quality and uniqueness between a $75 pinot and a $150 pinot is generally less dramatic than the difference between a $25 and $75 pinot. The most expensive pinots, regardless of where they come from, reflect their scarcity and prestige in the price more than any dramatic difference in quality.

A number of people in the industry have told me that the most appropriate price for a wine is the amount people are willing to pay for it. Some brands carry certain reputations that allow them to charge more than their peers, which often means those brands are doing extra work to build and maintain their reputations, including (but not limited to) producing smaller quantities to maintain exclusivity. While these efforts don’t necessarily reflect the quality of the wine, they can reflect an added cost input. It’s no secret that part of what makes designer products so expensive is the amount they spend on advertising and promotion. The wine industry is no different in terms of the high cost of generating and maintaining excitement and desirability among certain customer demographics.

Why this matters to the consumer: The final price you pay is reflective of how much it costs to produce, where consumers place it among its peers and the extent to which the wine is desirable. This is to say, you’re likely paying fair market value even if you feel like you’re getting a bad deal.

Myth #3: The Framework for Distributing and Selling Wine in America Benefits Consumers

Fact #3: Our three tier system limits customer choice, hurts small wineries, and makes wine more expensive to buy.

With all due respect to my friends in the distribution and wholesale tier, and those in the regulatory agencies, the compromises this country made to get out of Prohibition suck. In addition to adopting the three tier system, the compromise that ended the federal prohibition on alcohol included giving each state the protected right to set most of the laws that affect the liquor business within their respective borders. Regardless of one’s political ideology, it shouldn’t be hard to understand why fifty independent sets of regulations, rather than one, is a bad thing.

The three tier system is made up of, yep, three tiers: the producer, the distributor/wholesaler, and the retailer. For a consumer to purchase a bottle of wine outside of a winery, the winery must first sell to a distributor or wholesaler, who must then sell to a retailer, who can then sell to the consumer. The middle man second layer adds an extra margin to the price while also doubling marketplace competition  (the winery must offer a competitive price to the distributor/wholesaler who, in turn, must offer a competitive price to the retailer) that puts extra pressure on the producer to create room to bargain on unit price, often achieved by reducing costs (which can reduce quality). I could write a tomb on this, but won’t. I could also make a career out of ending it if someone had a decent number of billions of dollars to fund my efforts (anyone?). So, in brief, a few things to chew on:

(1) Corruption happens in highly regulated industries. Alcohol is very, very regulated. The ability to get a liquor license, distribution permit, import permit, retail license, permission to ship out of or into a state, and more, are all effected by corruption in one way or another. This artificial influence on the marketplace creates artificial – noncompetitive – distortions that skew consumer choice and inflate or deflate prices (depending on the situation).

(2) Fifty sets of regulations plus three tiers of selling means the financial and labor cost of meeting the regulatory burden and expanding one’s market (paying for distribution) is incredibly high. Further, because it raises the cost of doing business out of state the same amount for each winery regardless of size or profits, it disadvantages smaller and many medium-sized wineries that can’t afford the costs. This limits the geographic footprint of their prospective consumer base – and the number of consumers who both want their wines and are able to get them.

(3) The combination of #1 and #2 creates semi-monopolies for the large winery ownership groups/corporations that can pool resources from across their portfolio to ensure all of their labels are available everywhere. Depending on how the ownership group/corporation handles this advantaged position, this can be a good or bad thing for the industry. Some do it more humbly and intelligently than others.

(4) It incentivizes distributors and retailers to push larger labels (and wineries owned by larger labels) because they offer the distributor and retailer higher profit margins than smaller production wines that come at a higher per-unit cost but retail for the same price.

Why this matters to the consumer: Government regulation and an entrenched interest group (the second tier) are creating and enforcing a distorted marketplace in which you are forced to pay an artificially inflated price for wine you’re choosing from an artificially limited selection.

Myth #4: Growing Wine Grapes is Simple

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Fact #4: Vineyard decisions are major decisions that can be significant drivers of cost and quality.

One of the most cliché things you hear about wine is that it’s made in the vineyard. But even though the point gets overused, it can be very true if a winery wants it to be true. And for many of us, our favorite wines tend to be legitimately made in the vineyard.

Vineyards are also where some of the biggest unknowns in winemaking exist because the unpredictable and cruel Mother Nature sets the course. Vines are susceptible to weather events, pests, bacteria, hungry wildlife, fires and much more. This makes vineyard management an inherently defensive, reactive enterprise even though there are strategies and tactics for setting a vineyard up for success before there’s a problem. To hear winemakers and vineyard managers describe any particular vintage, they talk about all the proactive stuff they do, but when the unfortunate and inevitable “but” drops, it is almost always an act of nature that couldn’t be prevented. This makes making vineyard-driven winemaking risky and challenging, and explains what can be dramatic vintage variation from low-intervention winemakers. Preparing for and coping with Mother Nature is one of the factors that separates the Winemakers from the winemakers.

Additionally, vineyards require a lot of money and planning and take at least three years to mature once planted before commercial wine can be produced, if not five. Terroir-driven wines benefit most from well-planned vineyards, meaning the right sites and soils are found, then prepared prior to planting, and planted with the right vines, clones and rootstocks, and given the TLC needed to raise them right. From site scouting to purchase; from doing the soil and climate research needed to identify the right varietals, clones and rootstocks and the year it takes to get them once ordered; from the planting to the nurturing of young vines for at least three years before production-worthy grapes are produced, it can take upwards of six or seven years easy before a vineyard is producing. It takes many more years before all the investment is paid off and a profit is turned.

Why this matters to the consumer: Knowing how wineries approach their vineyards and vineyard sourcing (buying grapes from other growers) helps one differentiate between wineries in terms of the planning, care and investment they make in their vineyards. Those wineries that do it right, meaning those that take the time to do the research and don’t rush the process, are more likely to produce a greater run of better wine than those that don’t, all other factors being equal.

Myth #5: If it’s on the Shelf, it’s Ready to Drink

Neil Patrick Harris Drink Or Dish GIF by The Meredith Vieira Show - Find &  Share on GIPHY

Fact #5: Most premium wine will never be consumed at its best.

Estimates vary, but it’s safe to say that at least 90% of wine sold in America is consumed within a week of being purchased. The actual number is probably at least 95%, especially during COVID. The vast majority of that segment buy their wine from grocery stores and large wine sellers like Total Wines, which means most of that wine is sub or barely “premium wine” (a term that is usually defined as $20+ per bottle) and likely the current release (most recent vintage released for public sale). Sub or barely premium is fine (and in most cases probably best) to drink upon release like this.

However, most premium wine, I would argue red and white, improve over the three to five years following their release. I would put most New World premium red wine into this category, and a fair amount of wines from Old World regions. A smaller but sizeable chunk of premium wine doesn’t show its best for at least a decade. This is mostly Old World wine, with some New World in the mix.

It is impossible to know how much premium wine is captured in that 90%+ statistic, but I can offer significant antidotal evidence that it’s a statistically significant percentage. I’ve spoken with dozens of premium wine producers, and often ask them how many of their clientele, do they think, age their wines to full maturity. The answer is usually something like “very few” or “barely any.” Further antidotal evidence can be found looking at wine reviews on CellarTracker, a website used predominantly by discerning consumers that purchase the world’s better and best wines, where numerous reviews show evidence of premature consumption of wines that show their best years, if not decades, after release.

One could argue that the industry should shift to consumer preference and make more wines that are more accessible (meaning wines that require less aging to fully mature) upon release. That’s a fair argument, and a good chunk of premium wine producers make two levels of wine – somewhat less expensive and more accessible wines, and more expensive and age worthy wines. But for a small but dedicated segment of the market (where I reside), there’s nothing better than a fully mature premium wine. Thankfully, plenty of winemakers fall into that camp as well, and are able to make a few wines each that we fellow old wine lovers choose to age for years and years.

Why this matters to the consumer: Unless you thoroughly enjoy (or even prefer) young premium wine, you’re not getting the experience out of the wines you are buying that the wines – and the winemaker – intend you to have. Therefore, you may want to rethink your purchasing decisions because you may end up getting more pleasure out of different – and often less expensive – wine. Or, you should consider buying a wine cooler and putting some of your more structured wines to rest for a few years.

Author’s Note: This is the first Good Vitis piece focused exclusively on the business side of wine, which means it may be one of the more controversial pieces from this blog among our industry friends and followers. I hope it will be one of the more useful pieces for our readership. Regardless of whether you’re industry or a consumer, I’d love to hear your feedback. Please share it either with the group (post a comment) or send it directly to me at goodvitis(at)gmail(dot)com.

Zachys DC is Open and Raring to Go

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The new opening of a location of Zachys in Washington, DC is a big deal for the local wine market. Even though the location won’t have a retail storefront – at least for now – bringing one of the most influential names in wine to the District says something about the growing power and sophistication of the market here.

Zachys is bringing a number services to DC: wine storage; direct-to-consumer sales of wines otherwise not offered DTC to DC customers; tastings and classes; wine dinners; a customized corporate tasting service; collection assessment; other TBD events; and, for the first time in thirty years, a live wine auction. That last one isn’t an insignificant deal.

Wine auctions signal an opportunity to at least be around, if not acquire, the world’s best and often rarest wine. Putting aside for now the recent past proliferation of fake wine facilitated in part by wine auctioneers, including Zachys – a topic to be discussed in an upcoming Good Vitis review of In Vino Duplicitas – Zachy’s DC existence means a new and much higher level of access in DC to wines that likely wouldn’t otherwise be available to locals. While I imagine the best of Zachys’ lots will remain the purview of its New York auctions, Zachys wouldn’t have made the decision to enter the DC market if it didn’t think our market wasn’t craving a higher level of wine.

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Wine auctions are held in the biggest, most prestigious wine markets in the world: New York, London, Hong Kong, Geneva, and Paris are the standards. Although the biggest general auctioneers like Christie’s and Sotheby’s haven’t visited DC in a while, within the world of wine auctions Zachys is among the very top and their decision to auction wine in DC – their appropriately named inaugural “Capital Collection” auction will take place on October 27th and 28th of this year – marks Washington’s entrance onto that top stage, something that shouldn’t go unnoted.

Last Friday, I attended a grand opening party at Zachys, which featured sixteen different tables pouring wine from California, Virginia, France and Italy ranging in price from $14 to $1,110. From top to bottom these were good wines, many hitting their price point with impressive quality. The ability to source such a lineup is indicative of what I think Zachys is going to bring to my local market: a large range of impressive wines where anyone – even those who will never lift a bidding paddle – can find what they want. Welcome to town, Zachys!

Before signing off, I’ll highlight a few of the wines I found particularly impressive:

2014 MacMurray Range Central Coast Pinot Noir: At $19.99 it’s the best $20 California pinot noir I’ve had.

2013 RdV Vineyards Virginia Rendezvous Red Blend: While many feign spending $70 on a wine from Virginia, it stood out among the domestic offerings as the most multidimensional.

2015 Domaine Leon Boesch Sylvaner Les Peirres Rouges: a Sylvander for Sylvander haters and lovers, everyone should try this pleasurable $16 wine.

2014 Domaine Blain-Gegnard Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru La Boudriotte: The best white Burgundy of the night for me, I placed an order. Hard to beat at $59.99.

2014 Jl Chave Selections Saint Joseph Offerus: Year-in and year-out, this is a classic from one of the regions of the Rhone valley producing some of the prettiest syrahs. The 2014 doesn’t disappoint, and is a real value at $32.99.

2008 Chateau Larcis Ducasse St. Emillion: Really popping right now, it has all the classic St. Emillion notes and is far from poorly priced at $64.99.

2011 Chateau Margaux: Yes, it’s barely crawling at this stage, but when it gets to a full gallop…

2004 Roberto Voerzio Barolo Rocche dell`Annunziata Torriglione: From a 3 liter. Dear God, this was the best wine of the night. The bittersweet cocoa that comes with age on a fine Barolo is out in force. What a pleasure and treat.

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2012 Antinori Marchesi Pian Delle Vigne Brunello Di Montalcino: Despite having attended the Consorzio del Vino Brunello Di Montalcino’s 2012 vintage tasting in New York earlier this year, I hadn’t yet had this marvel of a wine that is, for me, a standout wine in a standout vintage. I grabbed a few for myself.

Living Legends of Washington Wine

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The term “first ballot hall of famer” is a sports term. I don’t know about professional sports leagues outside the United States, but in America each of the major sports leagues has their own hall of fame, and every year new members are selected by a group of electors. Many hall of famers don’t make the cut the first year they’re eligible, but those who do are called “first ballot hall of famers” and the phrase is often used to refer to active players who will undoubtedly be elected in their first year of eligibility. Last Friday I attended a Washington wine event outside Seattle and the room was stocked with first ballot hall of Washington wine famers. I fanboyed pretty hard.

The occasion was The Auction of Washington Wines. Spread out over several days and several events, it is christened by Wine Spectator as the fourth largest charity auction in the United States. This year was record-setting for the auction, raising over $4.1 million for the Seattle Children’s Hospital and Washington State University’s Viticulture and Enology Program. The event I attended, the Private Barrel Auction, was a trade-only event that a few media types were invited to attend as well.

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Twenty wineries each donated a barrel of wine to the auction, but the catch was that each barrel had to be a wine that was made specially for the auction and would not be made available to anyone other than the winning bidder, meaning these were unique barrels. We were treated to samples of each in the lead up to the auction, and clearly many of the winemakers had fun with the project. When an industry-leading winemaker gets to play with a barrel’s worth of world class fruit, the results can be good. When they know they’re putting their wine up against their friends and competitors in an auction where the participants are retailers and restauranteurs who are considering only the sellability of the wine, the motivation to perform skyrockets.

Real quick, because I know some readers are wondering, the following wineries participated: Force Majeure, Delille Cellars, Forgeron Cellars and The Walls (a collaboration), Mark Ryan, Va Piano, Col Solare, Long Shadows, L’Ecole No. 41, Fidelitas, Woodward Canyon, Sleight of Hand, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Quilceda Creek, Owen Roe, Januik, Pepper Bridge, Brian Carter, Leonetti, Dusted Valley and Betz. All of these, in one room at the same time, with the winemaker from each pouring their unique one-off projects. Holy crap, right? Exactly. Januik was our wonderful host for the tasting and lunch, which was prepared at their in-winery restaurant by their very impressive chefs using a range of local ingredients. We later transitioned to Chateau Ste. Michelle for the auction. Kudos to both for providing barrels and such generous hospitality.

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I made it through seventeen of the twenty wineries before lunch was served as I enjoyed talking to the winemakers not just about their barrels, but other topics as well, and couldn’t keep pace. The most magical moment came at Sleight of Hands when, after tasting my favorite wine of the day and catching up with one of wine’s most fun-loving personalities, Trey Busch, the legendary champion and producer of Washington wine Bob Betz stopped by to endorse Trey’s talents and have a sip of Busch’s wine with us. I couldn’t pass up that opportunity for a picture with the two of them.

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The author with Bob Betz (L) and Trey Busch (R)

The vast majority of the wines came from the 2016 vintage, which Owen Roe’s David O’Reilly told us began early. He has about 10 acres of cherries that he uses as his indicators of when the vitis will kick off, and in his 45 years he’s never seen it start so early. He braced for a really hot growing season, but by summer temperatures had regressed towards the mean. By the end of August, evening temperatures were in the 40s and harvest stalled. This gave the fruit extended hang time, preserving aromatics and flavors. The end result are wines lower in pH than normal with extremely deep colors (this was very evidence in the samples). He described the vintage as “unmistakably ripe, but every element sings at very high levels.” Rick Smalls of Woodward Canyon compared the vintage to those from the days of when he started his winery forty years ago, saying that now, across the industry, consumers are getting real senses of place in Washington wines as winemakers and vineyard managers learn more and more about their sites and fruit.

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L-R: Bob Betz, Ted Baseler, Rick Small, David O’Reilly

Ted Baseler, president and CEO of Ste Michelle Wine Estates, attributed this evolution in part to Washington State University’s (WSU) Viticulture and Enology Program, saying that when Michelle brought viticulturists onboard not that long ago, they needed five-plus years of training, whereas now, getting them out of WSU, “they’re turnkey.” Baseler, whose prescience of the Washington wine industry is well respected, predicted that in twenty to twenty-five years, the state would see an increase in planted acreage from the 60,000 it has today to 200,000 (nearing parity with today’s Napa). He also predicted a rise from today’s ~900 Washington wineries to 3,000. These are bold predictions, but given the state’s growth to this point, it’s not impossible if current consumer trends continue.

The vast majority of wines on offer were cabernet sauvignon-dominate, not surprising for Washington, which is best known for the varietal. The outliers included a 100% grenache dubbed “Duex Dames du Vin” produced in partnership by the female winemakers of Forgeron and The Walls, a very impressive 100% petit verdot from Mark Ryan, a Bordeaux blend featuring majority cabernet franc from Brian Carter, and 100% syrahs from Force Majeure, Sleight of Hand and Quilceda Creek.

All of the wines showed like barrel samples, which is to say far from complete integration and with dense, mouth-coating tannins. I’m continually impressed when I see highly descriptive notes from barrel samples as it’s a significant challenge to get into the complexities of young, brutish red wine. From a small but growing amount of first-hand experience, I still take barrel sample scores with a great deal of salt, but that said, there were some real standouts in this bunch.

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On the cabernet front, Long Shadow’s “Winemaker Selection” blend of cabernet sauvignon, petit verdot, malbec and merlot showed a lot of developing complexity and intrigue that, with ten-plus years, is going to be spectacular. Woodward Canyon’s 100% cabernet from 40-year old vines in Champoux Vineyard had a real presence with layers of savory flavors, cassis, blackberry, mocha and spice. Leonetti’s barrel was filled entirely with cabernet from block 7 in the Mill Creek Upland Vineyard. My first scribble is “oh my, good.” It’s dark, dark stuff with smoke, iodine and bacon that could be mistaken for a syrah at this stage, though it had the fruit, mocha, graphite and mineral core that one would expect from Walla Walla loam soils that I imagine will emerge more prominently and eventually dominate with time. Col Solare’s Estate Blend of 70% cabernet sauvignon clone 2 and 30% cabernet franc clone 214 offered refreshing herbaciousness and spice, and I imagine I’d enjoy this quite a bit in the future.

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The three standout wines, however, had no cabernet in them. Mark Ryan’s 100% petit verdot was perhaps the most complex varietally bottled PV I’ve had (and it’s still young!). The nose was wild and briary, the tannins lush and already polished. The acid drove this pretty wine, delivering pepper, violets and loads of purple fruit. Quilceda Creek, known for its many 100-point single vineyard cabernet sauvignons, had fun with syrah in an effort that fetched the highest bid at the auction. They delivered what they described to me as “a cabernet lover’s syrah,” evident in its structure and mouth feel. Yet, it offered smoked meat and iron. It was very cool and quite delicious. The wine of the night, though, was Sleight of Hand’s 100% syrah from Lewis Vineyard that was raised entirely in concrete egg. Super funky stuff, it’s my kind of syrah. It’s level of polish and integration was the most impressive aspect of any wine of the day given its youth, and it will develop with time into something truly special.

As if this born-and-bred Washingtonian needed more evidence that Washington wine rocks, this event provided ample amounts. What it did expose me to, though, for the first time at such a high level, is the amount of camaraderie that exists at the pinnacle of the industry. No one in the room believed that Washington wine had reached peak quality, and they’re working together as much as anyone could reasonably expect in what is really a foolish effort to summit that mountain. The reality is that the mountain keeps getting higher.

Many thanks to The Auction of Washington Wines for allowing me to attend, to the wineries and winemakers for putting in great efforts to raise money for worthy causes, and to my friend Jesse for taking some great pictures.