Good Vitis’ 2017 Tastemakers Part 1

IMG_0220

I did a lot of this in 2017, and really enjoyed it in large part due to the 2017 Tastemakers

I realize I’ve never fully explained on Good Vitis why I started the blog, but this post is evidence that it’s been working. In 2013 and 2014 I was able to intern at a Virginia winery and, between the two vintages, participate in every stage of the winemaking process at least once. Following that fantastic experience, I looked for ways to remain engaged with the industry to continue my education, and in the Fall of 2016 started Good Vitis with the hope that it would become successful enough to attract samples, industry connections and event invitations through which my education could continue.

Fast forward to the end of 2017 and there’s evidence that with building it, they’ve come. Samples, event invitations and winery visit invitations have rolled in at a decent pace and dramatically expanded the exposure I’ve had to new wine, new experiences and new knowledge. The most enjoyable benefit of the blog’s success, though, is the people it’s allowed me to meet. I’ve made some great friends, and, for the purposes of this post, met some people who have taught me a lot about wine and influenced my palate.

These are Good Vitis’ Top Tastemakers of 2017, meaning they are the people who most influenced how I think about and approach wine. They also happen to be pretty cool people, and all produce wine that I can’t recommend enough. Even more than that, they are people I suggest visiting if you’re in their neck of the woods. What follows, listed in no particular order, is Part 1: short profiles of three people, beginning with a personal introduction and then their responses to my questionnaire sent to each.

Erica Orr

EricaOrr

Having been a big fan of Baer Winery for a long time (her 2010 Arctos claimed the #8 spot on my Most Memorable Wines of 2017), I knew Erica through her wine before I ever met her. When I had the 2010 Arctos this Summer, I posted a review on social media and then featured it in a post. Erica reached out to thank me for the review, and we started a correspondence about Baer wine and, when I learned about her chenin blanc project, that wonderful white varietal as well.

In August, when I was home in Seattle, I visited her office where we talked shop and I learned about the full breadth of her endeavors, which include both winemaking and enology consulting. Her passion is obvious, knowledge expansive, zeal contagious, and wine incredible. The walls of her office are filled with maps of wine regions from around the world, places she’s explored on foot. If you follow her on social media, you see the self-exploration effort is pretty routine for her, actually, as she shares what she’s tasting. Erica never seems to rest, and she’s always learning. Like, always. She’s an inspiration for me in this sense, motivating me to make sure I’m not relying on what I think I already know. She puts a lot into her work, and it comes through in the bottle.

  1. Winery and role: Orr Wine Lab, enologist; winemaking consultant for Baer Winery, Guardian Cellars, Orr Wines.
  2. Number of years in the wine business: 19.
  3. Previous wineries/roles: enologist at Rudd Estate; harvest intern at Domaine Dujac, Cain Vineyard, Yering Station, Corison Winery.
  4. What got you into the wine business: I randomly met winemaker Aaron Pott at a bar in San Francisco in 1998 and he told me about his experiences working at wineries around the world and the winemaking program at Davis.
  5. Why you choose the route/role you did: Education and formal training are super important but so is learning by doing.
  6. One sentence description of your approach: “A classic style for the modern table” is my back-label text – I want to be literate in the great wines of the world while making authentically delicious wines that are true to the place they are grown.
  7. Accomplishments you’re most proud of: My chenin blanc poured by the glass at Walrus and the Carpenter in Seattle and Baer Ursa making Wine Spectator’s Top 100 twice.
  8. Your blind spots (where you need to improve):  I want to learn more about how wine changes over time especially in terms of determining when a bottling should be released.
  9. Where and what do you want to be doing in ten years: I hope to be crafting and tasting delicious wines together with colleagues and friends I admire.
  10. Top-3 bucket list wines: These are wines that changed my life: 1995 Cain Five, 2010 Merriman Columbia Valley Chenin blanc and 2007 DRC Batard-Montrachet.

Rick Rainey

RickRainey

When I first met Rick, it was late afternoon on a cool, windy and clear day at his winery up the hill from Lake Seneca. We rolled up in our car and there he was, a vision in shorts, a fleece and boots. #SoooFLX. My friend and I were in pants and sweaters, with jackets within arms’ length reach. #SoNotFLX. Over the following three hours, Rick dropped serious vineyard and winemaking knowledge, regaled us with numerous funny stories, and poured killer rieslings and pinots.

As I wrote in the post about the visit, Rick and crew have captured the Finger Lakes – and Central New York – in a bottle, somehow infusing the people and culture of the region into the juice. I only spent a year living in Syracuse, but I could recognize it, and it’s something special. I’ve lived in four states and five countries, and nowhere did I experience such a strong sense of camaraderie among communities.

This is partly because the community extends to include the land; there’s a real commitment to it in Central New York regardless of what one does or where in the region they live. Forge Cellars is trying to produce the best Finger Lakes wines they can, and they’re helping to strengthen the community – and its connection to the land – along the way.

  1. Winery and role: Forge Cellars, Partner and General Manager
  2. Number of years in the wine business: 23
  3. Previous wineries/roles: My day job is working for an importer distributor. In that role I have been a sales person, a brand manager (French buyer), Director of Sales Education and currently a Sales Manager. Previously I worked in the restaurant trade in Philadelphia and for Chat. Lafeyette Reneau in the Finger Lakes.
  4. What got you into the wine business: The challenge. History, science, culture, joy all wrapped up in one product.
  5. Why you choose the route/role you did: The route – because the wine business in the U.S. was so young 20 years ago nobody really knew what requirements you should have. It allowed anyone with passion in. The role – at Forge I am interested in all facets of the business. I enjoy what happens in the cellar, I like guiding the strategy in the vineyards and I even like looking at how we can be a better business. It makes sense that I am the “general” manager then.
  6. One sentence description of your approach: I will borrow it from Louis’ [Barruol] father “first you have discipline then you have artistry.” I feel like my job is to have an eye always towards the discipline so that we can all be as creative as possible.
  7. Accomplishment you’re most proud of: Starting a winery in an emerging region from nothing with little financial resources and making it to the WS Top 100 five vintages into this amazing journey. Believe it or not, I also enjoy when writers come to the winery, taste the wines and “get it.” That truly makes me happy.
  8. Your blind spots (where you need to improve): Everywhere. The joy of this is that you can improve and must improve every day. For instance, I moved a hose hook this weekend down 12 inches because I noticed Alex (who works in the cellar) had to struggle to put the hose back. If she struggles then perhaps she doesn’t put it back, it doesn’t go back then maybe somebody trips and on and on. I enjoy the constant evolution.
  9. Where and what do you want to be doing in ten years: Exactly what I am doing now. I hope we have a stable winery that challenges us but brings everyone joy that works there. We are very lucky to be in such a dynamic place to make wine.
  10. Top-3 bucket list wines: Raveneau Chablis (I have a six pack in my office…it is calling to me), St. Cosme Cote-Rotie or Hermitage and Chateau Yquem.

Lisa Hinton

Lisa Hinton

Lisa is the winemaker at Old Westminster Winery, which I’ve raved about twice on these pages (most recently here). I’ve had a lot of fun spending time at the winery where I’ve witnessed that Old Westminster really is a family effort focused on putting Maryland on the world wine map.

Maryland isn’t an easy place to make wine. The climate is highly varied, both in the sense of microclimates and weather from year-to-year. Drew does an impressive job of bringing quality fruit to Lisa, and Lisa turns it into great wine. When I tell people I could pour them a glass of Old Westminster wine blind and they’d recognize the superb quality without knowing where to point geographically, let’s just say most don’t believe me. For those with whom I’ve been able to do this, I haven’t been wrong once. With more consumer awareness, I know Old Westminster can go from producing world class wine, which they already do, to making a name for identifiable Maryland terroir as well.

A lot of this, obviously, is due to Lisa’s talents. When you witness Lisa running the winery, it’s clear why the wine comes out so good. I normally wonder around the crush pad with Drew, and I feel like we’re a little lost sometimes – “hey Lisa, um, where’s the franc?” Indulging us, she yells out a tank number, but doesn’t really break stride as she moves around with a purpose. She knows what she wants to do, what she’s doing and what she needs to do next, and she’s doing this while marshaling a crew of cellar hands, interns and groupies who, like me, flock to the winery. It’s sort of like watching Chris Paul run a basketball team: Lisa can do it all.

  1. Winery and Role: Winemaker & Owner of Old Westminster Winery
  2. Number of years in the wine business: 7
  3. Previous Wineries/Roles: My siblings and I founded Old Westminster fresh out of college in 2011, so most of my experience is there. I also had the honor of working as a cellar hand at Patz & Hall and Bedrock Wine Co. in Sonoma, CA.
  4. What got you into the wine business: In 2009, family discussions began on “how to preserve our farm and put the land to work.” We were captivated by the idea of planting a vineyard. We all agreed that growing and making wine that reflects our land was an exciting proposition. The ensuing year was full of homework: reading, traveling, listening, planning, and tasting. We sought out producers from around the world who were making noteworthy wines. We quickly identified what we believed to be the common threads of success: a good vineyard site, thoughtful farming practices, attention to detail in the cellar, and a ceaseless desire to improve. In the fall of 2010, our research prompted a trip to the west coast. One spectacular evening while sitting on a terrace overlooking the vineyards of Saint Helena, we decided to chase our collective dream wholeheartedly. Upon returning to Maryland, that dream quickly materialized into a mission and a plan: To craft distinctive wines with a sense of place.
  5. Why you chose this role: As a chemist by education, my role of winemaker developed out of my skill set – conducting experiments, being thoughtful, and working really hard. I get to use my education while pursuing my dream to produce world class wines in Maryland.
  6. One sentence description of your approach: My goal is to produce balanced wines that reflect vineyard, variety, and vintage while experimentally challenging “the norms” of winemaking.
  7. Accomplishment you’re most proud of: My favorite achievement to this point was having our Petillant Naturel Albarino featured in Punch. I also take a lot of pride in being a successful female in a competitive, male-dominated industry.
  8. Your blind spots (where you need to improve): I tend to get so excited about a new innovation that I change too many variables at once. I need to learn patience in order to conduct more beneficial experiments.
  9. Where and what do you want to be doing in ten years: I want to be a thought leader in wine production by creating Maryland wines that stand among the best in the world.
  10. Top-3 bucket list wines: Wow, this is a hard one – I just genuinely enjoy tasting any low manipulation wines from around the world.

Part 2 of Good Vitis’ 2017 Tastemakers will be posted the week between Christmas and New Years.

Forge Cellars and the Terroir of the Finger Lakes

ForgeBuilding

The Winery (picture credit: forgecellars.com)

Forge Cellars doesn’t have a sign on the road indicating where visitors should turn. It doesn’t have a sign at or on the winery. You’re supposed to just find it. And you’re supposed to be happy to have found it. And then after you’re there you’re supposed to be thankful for finding it. Well, we found it. We enjoyed it. And we’re thankful we did.

We were told that the majority of negative feedback they receive at Forge is about their the lack of signage. They’re not hard to find, it’s stupid. And the absence of location pointers helps keep unseasoned and uninformed tourists (read: annoying and disrespectful porch pounders (no offense)) from stumbling onto the incredibly cool facility and turning the place into a tourist trap and bachelorette destination, and ruining it for the rest of us. So, thankfully, no signs.

The first thing you notice when you arrive at Forge is the view:

IMG_1822

And then you’re likely to walk to the front of the building, noticing this:

IMG_1813

Turning, then, to see this:

IMG_1815

The tasting table

Then Rick Rainey greets you. No pretense, no bullshit, just a huge commitment to finding the best vineyard sites, working with his partner Louis Barroul of Cheateau de Saint Cosme to make stellar riesling and pinot noir, intelligently designing and building a winery, giving back and adding substance to the region, and treating his guests to very fun tastings. Tastings require a reservation, and Rick does them very purposefully: everyone sits at the same table with each other, and the group has one conversation. This includes any media types, even the big ones, industry people, winemakers – everyone. They taste with the rest of us. It’s a tasting for wine people, and Rick makes no distinctions after that.

I was first introduced to Forge by my friend Drew Baker of Old Westminster Winery in Maryland (another self-professed soil geek like Rick), who brought a bottle of Forge’s Classique riesling to a wine dinner. Later, on the strength of that bottle, when I collected bottles for the Good Vitis Grand America Riesling Tasting, I emailed Forge soliciting contributions. Rick ended up responding after the tasting, and apologized for not getting to the email sooner. When we sat down with him months later, he told me that he rarely bothers to send out samples, especially to people who haven’t already visited. “Get on a plane or in your car and come out here. You can’t adequately appreciate wine without meeting the people, experiencing the land and spending time in the winery.” I heard the message: you were never getting samples. “But now that we know each other, who knows, I might be open to it.” Again, the message: we’re cool now.

IMG_1819

Rick leading us down the rabbit hole of Finger Lakes riesling

Rick facilitated an amazing tasting with a group of 9 of us who didn’t know each other. Across the table were a couple from Connecticut. Next to them was a man, who had Finger Lakes orchards for decades but had recently converted them to wine grapes, and his wife. Wrapping around the far end was a group of three, and then my friend and I set next to Rick. We were there for three hours, and once we went through the line up Rick pushed the open bottles towards the center of the table and asked people to hang out and help finish them (it was 7pm on a Friday – get home time – so he had to have been having a good time). The conversation was high level, geeky, friendly and collegial, and lubricated by Forge’s wine and Rick’s entertaining stories and anecdotes.

Forge goes for about as simple a winemaking approach as they can, but they don’t advertise it, and they certainly don’t boast about it. They use seriously neutral oak (8-10 years old, usually), with many barrels coming in the 500 and 600 liter sizes. All the barrels are sourced from France by Barroul. Sulfur is quite minimal and other additives are eschewed. Rick is the vineyard guy. They’ve recently planted 8 new acres by the winery with a high density of around 2,100 vines per acre. They also source from 13 or 14 other spots near the winery. Residual sugar in the rieslings are kept low, usually no more than 2-3 grams per liter (though they taste bone dry), and the pinots are made largely from Pommard clones.

IMG_1820

A recent barrel shipment from Cosme

To Rick’s credit, he was right about his samples point: they’re doing something special at Forge and the experience of being there drives it home. Rick spoke several times about their commitment to the region, and within the region finding the best sites for the kind of wines they want to produce. But that’s typical winery speak. It was everything else that followed that made it clear how Forge is really about the region. He talked at length about the people of the Finger Lakes, its economic history and the role a revitalizing wine industry is playing in helping some of the poorest counties in New York State stay afloat while bringing smart people to the area who are dedicated to helping it succeed and expanding what it has to offer its residents and visitors. Our fellow taster who owned vineyards added his own thoughts on this, largely driving the argument that the wine industry was bringing jobs and smart people to the region, all for the better.

Forge wines don’t just represent what Rick does in the Vineyard and Barroul does in the winery, they also reflect the trials and tribulations of the region and its businesses, families and individuals who are its fabric. The Finger Lakes and Central New York, which has an important place in my heart from the time I spent there for graduate school, has a long history of tough times and tough people. These are estimably down-to-Earth types with an almost spiritual commitment to harmonizing with their land, an unforgiving land whose climate toughens the skin and head and rewards those who treat it with respect. As cheesy as it sounds, Forge’s wines have a little something extra, and I don’t think it’s unreasonable to suggest that its terroir includes these more human elements.

The first wine that Rick poured was the 2015 Classique riesling, which is a blend of multiple vineyards meant to be their gateway bottle and the one distributed most widely. At $19, it is an exceptional riesling and a great entry to the Forge lineup, offering notes of apricot, nectarine, Spanish almond, parsley and lime zest. The body was polished and lush, but offered balanced acidity.

The 2015 Leidenfrost Vineyard Dry Riesling is a step up at $24. The mineral-driven palate boasts flavors that are wild when put together in a riesling, boasting orange zest, raspberry, saline and apricot, finishing with a kick of smoked white pepper.

Sniffed blind, I would’ve called the 2015 Lower Caywood Vineyard Dry Riesling a chenin blanc from Savennieres. The palate offered a big glycerin sensation (not unlike some Savennieres, either) with big stone fruits and deep, deep minerality driving serious depth.

Next was the 2015 Sawmill Creek Vineyard, which was very ripe and dense. Rick believes it’s the most ageworthy riesling in the program from the vintage, and was best able to handle the larger barrels. The nose is powerful, almost sweet, while the palate offers a big structure and a nice amount of red fruits, which is a wonderful discovery in this varietal. The Sawmill is a bit of a fist in a velvet glove kind of wine, and I really liked it.

The best riesling, however, was the 2014 Les Allies. Big on fennel and bitter greens, sharp citrus and Devil’s Club with sneaky slate and flint streaks adding depth. Though savory elements drive the wine, it’s balanced by big hits of fresh apricot and peach on the finish. This is going to go through some cool short-term evolution in the cellar, and was my favorite riesling of the day.

We then moved on to the 2016 rose of pinot noir, which was a minuscule production of 85 cases. The wine saw 16 hours of skin contact, so this is no small animal. The nose is big on crushed berries, and the palate has a real captivating presence and density. It’s a sizable rose, but not heavy. The texture and weight are the real selling points on this one, and I’m told it sells out very quickly.

The penultimate wine was the 2015 Classique pinot noir that, like the Classique riesling, is meant to be an entry pinot. It goes far beyond entry, with a brilliant, high toned classic pinot nose of red fruits and baking spices. On the palate it’s more savory, herbaceous and spicy with a small dose of baking spice on the back end. Burgundian in style, it delivers great finesse and bright acid. A very impressive pinot for the price.

We finished with the 2014 Les Allies pinot noir. My oh my. These vines are planted in shale. The nose is dirty and fungal, and the fruit is dark. The palate boasts big minerals and a nice dose of smoke. The fruit is dark here as well, and it’s just ever so slightly toasty. There’s a fungal streak, but overall this is a mineral-driven wine for those with patience. My closing note was “very good.”

The entire experience at Forge was impressive, from the views at the winery, to the winery itself, to the way the wines capture the region, to the people and, I think above all else, to the seamlessness with which the effort meshes with its home in the Finger Lakes. Forge is Finger Lakes in a bottle, capturing its toughness, its beauty and its tranquility. I went into the visit with nothing other than a taste of one of their wines a year or two ago and Rick’s lackluster email habits shaping my expectations, and came away with the notion that Forge is among the most exciting wineries I’ve come across in America, even though they purposefully remain hard to find and generally eschew the spotlight. I also came away with a case of their wine and a desire to visit again next year when I assuredly will need more.